Mesh injury often affects not only health but mobility; the ability to engage in activities and to perform the simplest of daily tasks can be drastically reduced.  Supporting anyone who is chronically ill or in pain can take its toll on relationships. It can be so tough to watch a loved one suffer, unable to live their life to the fullest.

Mesh injury impacts not only the mesh injured person but it affects their family, friendships, jobs and their ability to feel useful or good about themselves.

Many families have been torn apart by this international medical disaster through no fault of their own, due to financial strain and the lack of support and awareness in the community.  It is a tragedy.

Wives, husbands, mothers and fathers are reporting daily, that families are being torn apart as a result of their suffering, their angst at not being able to be intimate with their partners due to pain and deep sadness at not being able to play with their children or grandchildren…

The caring role requires a lot of patience and empathy which can be very draining for the most even tempered of us.  Tempers can be frayed and our support reserves can deplete over time.

However, it’s ok to take a break and look after yourself, sometimes we need someone to talk to, there is a National Carers Counselling Programme (http://www.carersaustralia.com.au/how-we-work/national-programs/national-carer-counselling-program/ ) that is free/low fee available to you.

Phone 1800 242 636 to apply for carer sensitive support

http://www.carersaustralia.com.au/storage/nccp-dl-brochure-web.pdf

This brochure contains the information you need to reach out where ever you are in Australia